What Drove Major Feka Become a “Pilot”?
Albanian Daily News
Published February 2, 2015

Arber
Kadia


The
Albanian public became aware of Major Feka’s existence only after the news, in which
the helicopter he was flying went down in Spain on 28 January 2015 after a
police chase. Like many things in Albania this piece of information made all
the media go abuzz for two days and then everything went back to normal. Such
happenings do not disturb the flow of things in Albania almost as if a NATO
soldier had not died in an attempt to smuggle drugs from Morocco to Spain.
Sokol Feka is unfortunately a byproduct of an accepted norm. The pertinent question
here is: is the common folk shocked by this news or are the media outlets
fueling the debate and sentiment to serve higher interests?


In Albanian
country with hopes of EU integration, smuggling drugs, stealing or corrupting
officials is very common. In fact this is an accepted standard. So much so that
people that do not engage in these activities are considered as second-rate
citizens. Albanian folklore indicates that a bridegroom on the very day of his engagement
has to steal something from the house of his bride in order to be considered as
worthy for her family. In this context how can Major Feka be looked down upon
by Albanian society?


The
term pilot in Albania does not refer only to people that are capable on managing
a flying object in the air. The term pilot here takes reference to the Japanese
kamikaze pilots who would sacrifice themselves for the fatherland. This term is
used frequently in common parlance for people that are ready to sacrifice themselves
acting likes mules, smugglers or narcotic traffickers.


I do
not agree with what Major Feka has done or with any attempt to smuggle or
traffic drugs, however the reasons that force people go overboard need to be
addressed to Albanian politicians and international partners. How can anyone
have faith in the current system, while National Guard soldiers receive less
than USD300 per month, doctors receive less than USD500, highly decorated
soldiers less than USD800?



How
can they expect to deal with life’s hardships, when the justice system sentences
leniency for multiple time killers, when teenagers go around in cars worth all
their lifetime salary and when the central government applies the law to the
letter only when it sees fit?


Since
I have come back from Britain to live in this country I have witnessed openly a
deeply entrenched desire to continue the tradition of the bridegroom mentioned
above. In the Balkans and in Albania in particular we have a different sort of
“thief” or “pilot” if you like. The ruling “class” operates them through
deception and misdirection. This “class” does not believe in hard work. Why
should it, when a false impression, a quick trip over the border and a good
line of political psychobabble can achieve much more? Until this new “tradition”
is eradicated, pilots like Major Feka will continue to make flights that in
their psyche are not kamikaze but an accepted form to fit in a society that
lives and breathes in illicit activities.







Politics
MORE
Economy
MORE
Social
MORE
Current Events
MORE
Op-Ed
MORE
World News
MORE