Donald Trump Visit to London Called Off amid Fears of Mass Protests
Albanian Daily News
Published January 12, 2018
Donald Trump and Theresa May pictured in Brussels ahead of a Nato summit meeting in May last year. Photograph: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Donald Trump has cancelled a visit to Britain next month to open the new US embassy in London amid fears of mass protests.

The American president claimed on Twitter that his reason for calling off the trip was his displeasure at Barack Obama having sold the current embassy for "peanuts" and built a replacement for $1.2bn. "Bad deal," he wrote.

But the embassy's plan to move from Mayfair to Nine Elms in London was first reported in October 2008 - when George W Bush was still president and Obama had not yet been elected.

Theresa May invited Trump for a state visit when she became the first world leader to visit the president in the White House a year ago.

With activists pledging to stage mass protests and MPs determined not to give the president the opportunity to address parliament, no date for a state visit has been set.

Donald Trump has cancelled a visit to Britain next month to open the new US embassy in London amid fears of mass protests.

The American president claimed on Twitter that his reason for calling off the trip was his displeasure at Barack Obama having sold the current embassy for "peanuts" and built a replacement for $1.2bn. "Bad deal," he wrote.

But the embassy's plan to move from Mayfair to Nine Elms in London was first reported in October 2008 - when George W Bush was still president and Obama had not yet been elected.

Theresa May invited Trump for a state visit when she became the first world leader to visit the president in the White House a year ago.

With activists pledging to stage mass protests and MPs determined not to give the president the opportunity to address parliament, no date for a state visit has been set.

Relations with the controversial president hit a low late last year when May criticised his decision to retweet material posted by the far right extremist group, Britain First.

Trump responded by tweeting directly to the prime minister that she should focus on tackling domestic terrorism.

The government was so concerned about his decision to share the extremist videos that Britain's ambassador to Washington, Sir Kim Darroch, took the rare step of raising the issue directly with the White House.

Trump's ambassador to London, Woody Johnson, subsequently insisted: "The president and the prime minister have a very, very good relationship. I know the president admires and respects the prime minister greatly."

He added: "My job and the president's job is to protect Americans. He's doing the best that he can.

"You're going to have little stumbles along the road. Absolutely. You're going to have things that happen. But the intent is there and it's genuine, and it's going to happen."

May's government has been keen to strike up a close working relationship with the Trump administration despite his erratic behaviour, because of Britain's desire to strike a swift trade deal with the world's largest economy.

When the PM visited the White House, she was pictured holding hands with the president.

Trump has sparked alarm among diplomats by repeatedly entering into Twitter spats with key public figures, including North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, to whom he recently boasted about the size of the US nuclear arsenal.

(Source: The Guardian)




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